The Civil Rights Act of 1964 – 52nd Anniversary

06/30/2016

Portrait

The Civil Rights Act of 1964 (Pub.L. 88–352, 78 Stat. 241, enacted July 2, 1964) is a landmark piece of civil rights legislation in the United States that outlawed major forms of discrimination against racial, ethnic, national and religious minorities, and women.  It ended unequal application of voter registration requirements and racial segregation in schools, at the workplace and by facilities that served the general public (known as “public accommodations”).

Powers given to enforce the act were initially weak, but were supplemented during later years. Congress asserted its authority to legislate under several different parts of the United States Constitution, principally its power to regulate interstate commerce under Article One (section 8), its duty to guarantee all citizens equal protection of the laws under the Fourteenth Amendment and its duty to protect voting rights under the Fifteenth Amendment. The Act was signed into law by President Lyndon B. Johnson, who would later sign the landmark Voting Rights Act into law.

Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Civil_Rights_Act_of_1964

6/24/14 US House and Senate leaders posthumously award the Congressional Gold Medal to Martin Luther King, Jr. and Coretta Scott King at a ceremony marking the 50th anniversary of the Civil Rights Act of 1964.
6/24/14 US House and Senate leaders posthumously award theCongressional Gold Medal to Martin Luther King, Jr. and Coretta Scott King at a ceremony marking the 50th anniversary of the Civil Rights Act of 1964.

johnson-obama-50yr

Desiline Victor, 102, stood in line for three hours to cast her vote on Oct. 28, 2012. Ms. Victor was a guest of First Lady Michelle Obama to listen to President Obama’s 2012 State of the Union address.
Desiline Victor, 102, stood in line for three hours to cast her vote on Oct. 28, 2012. Ms. Victor was a guest of First Lady Michelle Obama to listen to President Obama’s 2012 State of the Union address.

Congress: Honor Dr. King, @repjohnlewis, and all of Selma’s foot soldiers by working to immediately.

June 25, 2013

Statement by the President on the Supreme Court Ruling on Shelby County v. Holder

“I am deeply disappointed with the Supreme Court’s decision today. For nearly 50 years, the Voting Rights Act – enacted and repeatedly renewed by wide bipartisan majorities in Congress – has helped secure the right to vote for millions of Americans. Today’s decision invalidating one of its core provisions upsets decades of well-established practices that help make sure voting is fair, especially in places where voting discrimination has been historically prevalent.

As a nation, we’ve made a great deal of progress towards guaranteeing every American the right to vote. But, as the Supreme Court recognized, voting discrimination still exists. And while today’s decision is a setback, it doesn’t represent the end of our efforts to end voting discrimination. I am calling on Congress to pass legislation to ensure every American has equal access to the polls. My Administration will continue to do everything in its power to ensure a fair and equal voting process.”

.

Contact your legislator

The Supreme Court just gutted the most important civil rights law in our country — the Voting Rights Act. This decision is an extremely disappointing setback for voting rights in this country. Now it’s up to Congress to enact new legislation to protect the rights of voters, and it’s up to us to make them act.

Contact your Congress person to Republicans it’s time to pass laws toRESTORE and PROTECT VOTING RIGHTS!!!

U.S. Senators
U.S. Representatives
Tweet a Message to Your Representatives

.
US Minorities Civil Rights Timeline 1863-1963 (ProPresObama.org Civil Rights Timelines ™)

US Minorities Civil Rights Timeline 1964-2016 (ProPresObama.org Civil Rights Timelines ™)

.

#CivilRightsMovement

#RestoreTheVRA

 

Reblogged ProPresidentObama 

Obama_Biden_thumbnail

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s